The Beyond The Road campaign tells the story of TxDOT's environmental responsibilities. Every day, teams of archeologists, historians and environmental scientists work with engineers to plan around the state’s natural, historical and community resources before building roads and bridges.

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What is Crossing TxDOT Roads? Take a Wild Guess!

With more than 80,000 miles of road in Texas, we are bound to meet a few interesting characters along the way. TxDOT built wildlife crossings on the road leading to the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge near South Padre Island. It is just one of the things we do to care for the environment. So far, more than 4,000 creatures – big and small – passed through.

Bats Love Texas Bridges

You’ve heard of Texas football and certainly Texas barbeque, but what about Texas bats? More than 32 different species of bats hang out in Texas, many under the bridges managed by TxDOT. In fact, Texas is home to the largest bat population in the United States. Since 1980, TxDOT biologists and engineers have worked together to research and conserve the bat colonies that live in bridges around the state. Explore our resources to learn why!

 

 

Roadside History

Did you know that Route 66, also known as “America’s Highway,” runs through the northern part of Texas? The state of Texas created a plan in 2009 that asked the Texas Historical Commission (THC) and TxDOT to identify and mark historic roads and highways in Texas. Their work uncovered historic gas stations, motels, diners and bridges across the state. Read more about some historic highways below:

Story Maps

See roadside history come to life through these map-based stories.

Podcasts from TxDOT Roadside Chat

You can also find TxDOT Roadside Chat on iTunes.

 

Mammoth Watch 2018

In 2017, TxDOT discovered fossilized bones of a large ice-aged animal. Subscribe to this page for updates. 

Want to Dig Deeper?

Partner with TxDOT

Fill out this form to invite Beyond The Road to your next community event or conference.

Contact us today to help share stories about your community.

Learn more about the Environmental Statewide Public Involvement Plan to get more people involved with TxDOT’s environmental programs.

Partners include:

  • Higher Educational Institutions
  • Schools and Teachers
  • Scout Organizations
  • Non-profit and non-governmental organizations
  • State and Local Parks
  • Main Street Program Communities
  • State and Local Museums

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